Understanding Fallacies

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Style Over Substance

The manner in which an argument (or arguer) is presented is taken to affect the likelihood that the conclusion is true.

Example

  1. Nixon lost the presidential debate because of the sweat on his forehead.
  2. Trudeau knows how to move a crowd. He must be right.
  3. Why don't you take the advice of that nicely dressed young man?

Proof

While it is true that the manner in which an argument is presented will affect whether people believe that its conclusion is true, nonetheless, the truth of the conclusion does not depend on the manner in which the argument is presented. In order to show that this fallacy is being committed, show that the style in this case does not affect the truth or falsity of the conclusion.

Reference

Davis: 61

Reference Guide
Fallacy Summary

The content of this Fallacy originated from Stephen Downes Guide to Logical Fallacies.

 

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